Person(or Creature) of Interest – Coinín Earraigh

Name: Coinín Earraigh

Age: Timeless

Appearance:  Now known as the Easter Bunny, he is fat with smooth, silky white fur and wears a vest of many colors and a garish bowtie.  He carries a basket when on the job. He is humanoid in build now and hops in cute, kangaroo-like bounces. His eyes are huge and black but extremely shiny.  His bunny muzzle is graced with a human/animal hybrid smile, with ridiculously huge front teeth.

Background:  The creature we know now as the Easter Bunny was once Coinín Earraigh, a sleek brown hare that was a creature of the moon, fertility, and immortality.  He was a chosen of the Goddess for giving his last possession, an egg he painted, as a gift to her.  He was picked as her favorite for giving all he had, no matter how meager it was.

The celebrations then were far different, and about sex, fertility, and rebirth.  He represented the death of winter bringing forth the life of spring. He was loved on the day the God and Goddess were equal and creation rose again.  Strong and swift, he brought fertility to the world and reveled in it.

Then everything changed when the missionaries came.  At first, it was just a change to the trinity of Catholicism from the pantheon of Gaelic Gods and Goddesses.  He still represented fertility, and his role was the same. However, over time his role was downplayed and his magical story reduced to a fat rabbit that laid eggs.  This was not the worst that would happen to him.

In the 18th century belief was brought to the New World, and warped again, changing him from an egg-laying rabbit to a deliverer of candy, and a parody of everything he was.  Still, many other animal legends died and he was glad that despite the changes he was still believed in.

After 2 centuries of this, his opinion has changed.  He is weary of carrying candy, and feels insulted by the way time has warped his body.  He misses the fertility, the goddess and the moon. He wasn’t even worshipped, such as he was, on the proper day anymore, instead on Jewish Passover.  He felt like he had lost himself.

To feel the life of fertility again on the Equinox he would slip out into the night, trying to be the crafty hare he used to be.  He would go to the home of men and animals to find procreation to get a small taste of what his life used to be. He would then call to the moon ancient rites long forgotten and tell his story in a loud voice, albeit a goofy voice.

This year, however, something happened.  He went to the home of a human couple and peered into their home.  The pair were in a darkened room surrounded by candles with an altar set in the middle.  They chanted in an ancient tongue familiar to him, speaking of rebirth and sex. He felt his body become thinner and lither.  As he watched the pair removed their robes and came together, having reverent and passionate sex in the circle of candles.

He felt like himself as he watched when suddenly a burst of lightning struck the home, causing to leap to the shadows, instinct overriding his excitement.  A strange glow came from the room, and cautiously he hopped forward on all fours and looked in the window. The pair glowed with an unearthly light, and the naked female approached the window.

“Coinín,” the girl spoke in Gaelic and in a voice he recognized.  He pinned his ears back, unbelieving. She just smiled “my special chosen animal.  I have returned to the Earth to save it from the destruction that those who have disconnected from the truth of nature.  The world needs us more than ever, and I need you, my fertile, immortal friend.”

Coinín looked at himself.  Sleek, brown and fast with the silly vest and tie nowhere to be seen.  His goofiness replaced by the lust a hare should feel on this hallowed night.  While he desired to run into the world to rut, instead he approached his Goddess, hopping through the window.  He didn’t know what was coming but he wanted it more than anything.

Source of origin story – http://www.goddessandgreenman.co.uk/ostara

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